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Archive for March, 2012

“In every walk with nature, one receives far more than he seeks.”

— John Muir

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May the road rise up to meet you.
May the wind always be at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face,
and rains fall soft upon your fields.
And until we meet again,
May God hold you in the palm of His hand

— An Old Irish Blessing

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Whitney Houston died a couple of weeks ago. It was in the newspapers. On the news. All over the social media. Her funeral was televised with lots of so-called celebrities attending.

What went unnoticed except by the family and those in the immediate and rescue communities was the death of a Wyoming Search and Rescue member when the helicopter in which he was riding crashed while on a rescue mission for injured snowmobilers. And the recent death of a Coast Guardsman (and ongoing search for three others still missing) from the crash of a helicopter during a training seemed to be only one of countless other news stories flashing on our television and computer screens and instantly forgotten.

Whitney Houston’s talent and music touched many lives. Her death was sad, but really, except to her family and close friends, not a tragedy.

What is truly tragic are the deaths of rescuers everywhere who time and time again selflessly risk their lives for others, sometimes giving them up “so that others may live.”

They’re the true heroes.

“So That Others May Live.”

For information about the National Association for Search and Rescue, please visit their website at:

http://www.nasar.org/

A very special thank you to San Bernardino County [CA] Sheriff’s Department, Aviation Unit, for generously allowing me to use their photos in this blog. For more information, please visit their website at:

http://www.hoistandwinch.com/UserConference/2010/PDF/SGT_Dattilo_and_Dpt_Mike%20Ells.pdf

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Canada’s unchecked, indiscriminate destruction of HUGE swaths of Boreal forestland ultimately effects the entire planet. And their plan to poison and shoot from the air thousands of wolves is appalling and outrageous.

The following is lifted directly from a letter I received from Credo Action way back in MARCH of 2012.

“It just gets worse and worse.

To make up for the fact that rapid tar sands oil mining is threatening caribou herds by destroying vast swaths of rainforest habitat in Alberta, the Canadian government has called for strychnine poisoning and aerial shooting of thousands of wolves in areas of tar sands mining.1

Tell Prime Minister Harper: Stop Canada’s planned wolf killings!

If Alberta Canada’s tar sands oil fields are fully developed, an area of boreal rainforest the size of Florida will be eviscerated, leaving in its wake only giant ponds of toxic wastewater.2

It’s obvious why this would pose a massive threat to all wildlife species who reside there, including birds, caribou and the iconic spirit bear.

But instead of preserving the habitat caribou need for their survival, the Canadian government’s answer is to blaze ahead with tar sands oil extraction, and kill thousands of wolves who would naturally prey on the caribou. The Ministry of the Environment’s plan calls for aerial shooting, and poisoning with bait laced with strychnine — a particularly painful type of poison.

Tell Prime Minister Harper: Stop your planned wolf killings! Preserve wolf and caribou habitat, and stop the irresponsible development of tar sands oil which threatens all of us.

This plan to kill wolves is a misguided, cruel response that does nothing to alleviate the greater problem: Tar sands development is a huge threat to wildlife, local communities, and all of our futures.

But despite the clear negative consequences, the Canadian government continues working to rapidly expand tar sands production and sales, including with the Keystone XL Pipeline to export tar sands oil all over the world.

Understandably, this has begun to earn Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and many in the country’s government, a negative reputation, to which they are becoming increasingly sensitive.2

The Ministry of the Environment has not yet moved forward with this planned wolf kill. And with enough public pressure, we can get them to abandon the plan, and build the case for Canada to stop their devastating race to expand tar sands oil fields.”

The destruction continues. The slaughter continues.

This isn’t a Canadian issue.

It’s an American issue.

It’s a global issue.

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